Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals Study

Brief Synopsis of Study Results


Prevalence and predictors of weight change post discharge from hospital: a study of the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force

This study aimed to determine the factors associated with a patient’s nutritional status improving or worsening after they were discharged from the hospital.

Prevalence and predictors of weight change post discharge from hospital: a study of the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force


Lower handgrip strength at discharge from acute care hospitals is associated with 30-day readmission: A prospective cohort study

Assessment of nutrition status at discharge is rarely performed and in a previous study conducted by CMTF, it is known that patients’ nutritional status can deteriorate during hospitalization. This study examined the association between 30-day readmission and nutritional parameters at discharge.

Lower handgrip strength at discharge from acute care hospitals is associated with 30-day readmission: A prospective cohort study


The My Meal Intake Tool (M-MIT): Validity of a patient self-assessment for food and fluid intake at a single meal

The Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (NCCH) study revealed that medical and surgical patients who ate ≤ 50% of the food provided to them was an independent risk factor for length of stay (LOS).  Poor intake can lead to iatrogenic malnutrition, even in well-nourished patients and 20% of patients’ who stayed more than seven days did regress nutritionally. Dietitians typically will use “calorie counts” to determine if a patient consumes enough protein and calories to support recovery.  However, calorie counts cannot be completed for all patients and busy nursing staff may not consistently complete the forms.

The My Meal Intake Tool (M-MIT): Validity of a patient self-assessment for food and fluid intake at a single meal


Costs of hospital malnutrition

In a previous manuscript, the Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (NCCH) study revealed that the prevalence of malnutrition (SGA B + C) in adults admitted to Canadian hospitals, who stay more than 2 days, is 45%.  Additional data were collected during the study period to ascertain the cost of malnutrition, specifically attributed to a longer length of stay.  Two of the aims of this study were to determine the relationship between malnutrition and additional costs due to a longer length of stay and the influence of confounders* on this relationship. Potential additional costs due to further interventions or treatments was not counted... For complete details please view the document below.

Costs of hospital malnutrition


Factors associated with nutrition decline in hospitalized medical and surgical patients admitted for 7 d or more: a prospective cohort study.

The aim of this study was to examine factors associated with nutritional decline in medical and surgical patients. Nutritional decline was defined based on subjective global assessment (SGA) performed at admission and discharge. Data were collected on demographics, medical information, food intake and patients' satisfaction with nutrition care and meals during hospitalization; 424 long stay… For complete details please view the document below.

Factors associated with nutrition decline in hospitalized medical and surgical patients admitted for 7 d or more: a prospective cohort study


Nutritional assessment: comparison of clinical assessment and objective variables for the prediction of length of hospital stay and readmission

The objective of this study was to determine and compare if different nutrition indicators (NIs) can predict the outcomes of length of stay (LOS) and readmission in acute care hospitals. Malnutrition assessment needs to be efficient and this analysis determined if single NI or a combination of NIs had the best predictive ability for these… For complete details please view the document below.

Nutritional assessment: comparison of clinical assessment and objective variables for the prediction of length of hospital stay and readmission


Barriers to food intake in acute care hospitals: a report of the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force

The comprehensive Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (NCCH) study had 890 (87%) patients complete a validated mealtime access and food satisfaction questionnaire prior to discharge from hospital. The purpose of the survey was to determine the food intake barriers and their prevalence in diverse hospitals and determine whether patient, care or hospital characteristics were associated… For complete details please view the document below.

Barriers to food intake in acute care hospitals: a report of the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force


Decline in nutritional status is associated with prolonged length of stay in hospitalized patients admitted for 7 days or more: A prospective cohort study.

The objectives of this study were to assess the change in nutritional status during hospitalization and determine if its decline is associated with prolonged length of stay (LOS)....  For complete details please view the document below.

Decline in nutritional status is associated with prolonged length of stay in hospitalized patients admitted for 7 days or more: A prospective cohort study


Malnutrition at hospital admission—contributors and effect on length of stay: A prospective cohort study from the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force

CMTF undertook a comprehensive Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (NCCH) study between 2010 and 2013 that looked at the prevalence of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals, as well as patient and hospital outcomes. Eighteen hospitals from eight provinces enrolled 1022 patients and this thorough data collection identified significant gaps in practice with respect to prevention, detection… For complete details please view the document below.

Malnutrition at hospital admission—contributors and effect on length of stay: A prospective cohort study from the Canadian Malnutrition Task Force


Validity and reliability of the new Canadian Nutrition Screening Tool in the 'real-world' hospital setting

The Canadian Malnutrition Task Force (CMTF) in its 3 year study Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals (NCCH) undertook the two part task of 1) developing a simple nutrition screening tool, namely the Canadian Nutrition Screening Tool (CNST), that would be validated against subjective global assessment (SGA) – the gold standard for assessing malnutrition – and,… For complete details please view the document below.

Validity and reliability of the new Canadian Nutrition Screening Tool in the ‘real-world’ hospital setting


Predictors of dietitian consult on medical and surgical wards

This study set out to determine what predicts a dietitian consult for patients who are fed orally, and what proportion of malnourished patients are under the care of a dietitian. Malnutrition was determined by the gold standard subjective global assessment (SGA). The prevalence of malnutrition (SGA B + C) in adults admitted to medical or… For complete details please view the document below.

Predictors of dietitian consult on medical and surgical wards


Nurses' perceptions regarding the prevalence, detection, and causes of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: Results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Survey.

A European survey was modified for use in a Canadian context where over 300 nurses (response rate 48%), from 11 academic and community hospitals across Canada, completed the survey. The nurses worked on internal medicine and general surgery wards and the majority were front-line nurses who worked directly with patients. A few highlights of the… For complete details please view the document below.

Nurses’ perceptions regarding the prevalence, detection, and causes of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: Results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Survey.


Physicians' perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: Results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Survey

Physicians from 18 hospitals, in 8 provinces, completed a previously validated survey with a response rate of 35%. The majority of the physicians were male (61%), worked as attending physicians (76%) in academic teaching hospitals (75%), as internal medicine (47%). Specialists. Physicians were asked to evaluate current versus optimal practice with respect to: 1. Is… For complete details please view the document below.

Physicians’ perceptions regarding the detection and management of malnutrition in Canadian hospitals: Results of a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Survey.


Providing quality nutrition care in acute care hospitals: perspectives of nutrition care personnel

 

The aim of this qualitative study was to have nutrition care personnel identify and describe key enablers and challenges to providing quality nutrition care to hospitalized patients.... For complete details please view the document below.

Providing quality nutrition care in acute care hospitals: Perspectives of nutrition care personnel


© 2017 Canadian Malnutrition Task Force
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